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If you’re familiar with formulating meals based on NRC guidelines, you’ll know how much learning is involved and how much work goes into making a nutritionally sound recipe. While we’ve done that with our own pets and have also worked on some keto based recipes specific for a few shelter dogs with cancer/seizure (constantly tweaked based on the progression of their condition too), turning something so highly individualised into something for commercial use was a whole new ballgame. And that, is an understatement. 

We got a lot of questions (and possibly, doubt) on our PMR grinds when we first started. But right from the start when conceptualising the products, we wanted to adhere to single proteins so that they could be versatile. They could cater to those with multiple protein sensitivities, and they included boneless options for cooking which could be topped with bone grinds and used for raw. We wanted small portions and the convenience of mixing of proteins for variation, but are also advocating reduced packaging waste. Hence, the labour-intensive small balls in a single home compostable bag, because after all, we were trying to be sustainable. 

PROTEINS
We knew that when we do make mixed protein grinds in the future, it was going to be beyond PMR ratios. Yes, the ideation of NRC grinds happened right from the start, before TDG even began. But, there were so many kinks to iron out, and it only got worse along the way. For one, if you’ve made your own NRC recipe, you know that there tends to be multiple protein sources and a relatively long ingredient list. A single protein one would be highly challenging and heavily supplemented, which we wanted to avoid. Yet, we also needed to still (somewhat) cater to pets with possible protein allergy. 

GENERALISING
It also involved hours…and then weeks of formulation, working and reworking numbers on a spreadsheet. This recipe is good, but catering to dogs with varying weights and energy needs meant changes to nutrient needs; how do we tweak this in consideration of this pet profile versus that, for these minerals and this vitamin? Is this even possible? Is this variation ok? Should we give up?

(Continued in comments)
If you’re familiar with formulating meals based on NRC guidelines, you’ll know how much learning is involved and how much work goes into making a nutritionally sound recipe. While we’ve done that with our own pets and have also worked on some keto based recipes specific for a few shelter dogs with cancer/seizure (constantly tweaked based on the progression of their condition too), turning something so highly individualised into something for commercial use was a whole new ballgame. And that, is an understatement. We got a lot of questions (and possibly, doubt) on our PMR grinds when we first started. But right from the start when conceptualising the products, we wanted to adhere to single proteins so that they could be versatile. They could cater to those with multiple protein sensitivities, and they included boneless options for cooking which could be topped with bone grinds and used for raw. We wanted small portions and the convenience of mixing of proteins for variation, but are also advocating reduced packaging waste. Hence, the labour-intensive small balls in a single home compostable bag, because after all, we were trying to be sustainable. PROTEINS We knew that when we do make mixed protein grinds in the future, it was going to be beyond PMR ratios. Yes, the ideation of NRC grinds happened right from the start, before TDG even began. But, there were so many kinks to iron out, and it only got worse along the way. For one, if you’ve made your own NRC recipe, you know that there tends to be multiple protein sources and a relatively long ingredient list. A single protein one would be highly challenging and heavily supplemented, which we wanted to avoid. Yet, we also needed to still (somewhat) cater to pets with possible protein allergy. GENERALISING It also involved hours…and then weeks of formulation, working and reworking numbers on a spreadsheet. This recipe is good, but catering to dogs with varying weights and energy needs meant changes to nutrient needs; how do we tweak this in consideration of this pet profile versus that, for these minerals and this vitamin? Is this even possible? Is this variation ok? Should we give up? (Continued in comments)
It’s something that we’ve been working on for months (and months and months…) and now, we’re finally ready to (soft) launch it! 

NRC formulated raw meals for healthy adult dogs are now available in 2 recipes - Chicken, Atlantic Mackerel & Lamb as well as Pork, Duck & Fish Oil (link in bio).

Why feed based on NRC standards?

Formulated based on the National Research Council's (NRC) guidelines, these formulations do away with ratios and percentages of body weight entirely. Instead, it is a more precise method of feeding that achieves nutritional balance based on specific caloric needs of pets. By utilising the nutrient requirements established by science based research and recommendations, each ingredient in the formulation is used in specific amounts in meeting all of a pet's dietary requirements with no guesswork or eyeballing of ingredients.

All recipes are formulated to meet NRC standards and are calculated above your dog’s recommended allowance (while considering safe upper limits, if any), which accounts for vitamin and mineral interactions, anti-nutrients present in some foods, and any bioavailability concerns.

Do note that NRC formulated recipes tend to include multiple ingredients from various sources as the nutritional profiles of different protein types and cuts differ (eg. beef liver vastly differs from chicken/duck/pork/lamb livers, with varying bioavailability of minerals like copper). As such, do check the ingredient list to ensure that the recipe is suitable for pets with specific/known food sensitivities. Pets with multiple food sensitivities may opt to stick to single protein PMR diets with supplementation.

Available in store tomorrow onwards, and will be made available online next week. 

Have questions on how to calculate your dog’s caloric needs? Come speak to us!
It’s something that we’ve been working on for months (and months and months…) and now, we’re finally ready to (soft) launch it! NRC formulated raw meals for healthy adult dogs are now available in 2 recipes - Chicken, Atlantic Mackerel & Lamb as well as Pork, Duck & Fish Oil (link in bio). Why feed based on NRC standards? Formulated based on the National Research Council's (NRC) guidelines, these formulations do away with ratios and percentages of body weight entirely. Instead, it is a more precise method of feeding that achieves nutritional balance based on specific caloric needs of pets. By utilising the nutrient requirements established by science based research and recommendations, each ingredient in the formulation is used in specific amounts in meeting all of a pet's dietary requirements with no guesswork or eyeballing of ingredients. All recipes are formulated to meet NRC standards and are calculated above your dog’s recommended allowance (while considering safe upper limits, if any), which accounts for vitamin and mineral interactions, anti-nutrients present in some foods, and any bioavailability concerns. Do note that NRC formulated recipes tend to include multiple ingredients from various sources as the nutritional profiles of different protein types and cuts differ (eg. beef liver vastly differs from chicken/duck/pork/lamb livers, with varying bioavailability of minerals like copper). As such, do check the ingredient list to ensure that the recipe is suitable for pets with specific/known food sensitivities. Pets with multiple food sensitivities may opt to stick to single protein PMR diets with supplementation. Available in store tomorrow onwards, and will be made available online next week. Have questions on how to calculate your dog’s caloric needs? Come speak to us!